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Economic Center Blog

Interview On CNBC: Explaining The Shortage Of Supply In The Housing Market And Demographic Wave Of Demand

By FirstAm Editor on August 1, 2018

First American Chief Economist Mark Fleming was interviewed yesterday on CNBC and discussed housing supply and demand, affordability and challenges facing new home builders.

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Topics: Housing, In The News, Interest Rates, Millennials, Affordability

Good Timing: Loan Application Defect And Fraud Risk Drops As Home Purchases Take Higher Share Of Mortgage Market

By Mark Fleming on June 28, 2018

By now, everyone in the mortgage industry is aware that we are entering a market that will be dominated by purchase demand for the next several years. According to the latest Mortgage Bankers Association forecast, refinance transactions will make up 28 percent of total mortgages originated in 2018 and is forecasted to drop to 23 percent by 2020. This is, of course, due to the current environment of increasing mortgage rates that follows years of persistently low rates. Until last month, the average rate for a 30-year fixed mortgage had remained below 4.5 percent for 80 consecutive months. And since most homeowners have benefited from the low-rate environment, they now have little financial incentive to refinance, or sell and buy again. With mortgage rates continuing to rise, the financial value of keeping their current low-rate mortgages is likely to increase.

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Topics: Interest Rates, Fraud, Loan Application Defect Index

What's The Outlook For Housing Market Potential Amid Rising Mortgage Rates?

By Mark Fleming on June 18, 2018

With the Federal Reserve Open Market Committee (FOMC) decision to increase the Federal Funds Rate last week, the prospect of higher mortgage rates remains top of mind among real estate professionals and continues to generate headlines. Yet, changes to the short-term rate matter little to the housing market.

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Topics: Housing, Interest Rates, Federal Reserve, Insider

Quoted On Forbes.com: Rising Rates Can Increase Housing Demand

By FirstAm Editor on June 7, 2018

First American Chief Economist Mark Fleming was quoted Tuesday in a feature article on Forbes.com, explaining how rising rates can increase housing demand.

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Topics: Housing, In The News, Interest Rates, Millennials, Affordability

The Surprising Impact Of Rising Rates On Market Potential

By Mark Fleming on May 23, 2018

In April, the housing market continued to underperform its potential. Existing-home sales were 6.5 percent below the market’s potential for existing-home sales, according to our Potential Home Sales Model. Lack of supply remains the primary culprit. The inventory of homes for sale in most markets remains historically low, yet demand continues to rise as millennials further age into homeownership.

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Topics: Housing, Interest Rates, Insider

Interview On CNBC: Explaining The Link Between Rising Rates, Housing Supply And Affordability

By FirstAm Editor on May 18, 2018

First American Chief Economist Mark Fleming was interviewed yesterday on CNBC and explained the link between rising rates, housing supply and affordability.

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Topics: Housing, In The News, Interest Rates, Millennials, Affordability

What Does The Change In The 10-Year Treasury Note Mean For Housing Affordability

By Mark Fleming on May 7, 2018

At the May Federal Reserve (Fed) meeting last week, all eyes were on the 10-year Treasury yield. In late April, that yield topped 3 percent for the first time in more than four years. With yields on the rise, housing market participants expect this to mean higher interest rates from central banks. It’s often overlooked that the popular 30-year, fixed-rate mortgage is benchmarked to the 10-year Treasury bond. In fact, as shown in the chart below, since the end of the recession, the 30-year, fixed-rate mortgage has on average remained 1.7 percentage points higher than the 10-year Treasury bond yield. So, if that trend remains consistent, if the 10-year Treasury yield rises above 3 percent, then the 30-year, fixed-rate mortgage rate should also rise to 4.5 percent.


“The recent increase in the 10-year Treasury yield indicates higher mortgage rates are likely in the very near future. But, even as mortgage rates increase, we remain well below the historical average of about 8 percent for a 30-year, fixed-rate mortgage – and house-buying power remains strong.”

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Topics: Housing, Interest Rates, Real House Price Index, Federal Reserve, Affordability, Insider

What Drives Loan Application Defect Risk At The Local Level?

By Mark Fleming on April 27, 2018

A common adage about real estate is that it’s local. The dynamics of one housing market can be very different from another depending on the local economy and access to natural amenities, like mountains or water. The levels of loan application defect, fraud and misrepresentation risk vary greatly based on local conditions as well. In fact, substantial differences exist among the 100 markets that we track with the Loan Application Defect Index. For example, the riskiest market this month, Little Rock, Ark., is almost twice as risky as the safest market, Rochester, NY.

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Topics: Housing, Interest Rates, Loan Application Defect Index

The Market Dynamics Fueling The Great Housing Shortage

By Mark Fleming on April 20, 2018

In March, the housing market continued to underperform its potential. Actual existing home sales are 4.5 percent below the market potential for home sales, according to our Potential Home Sales model. The lack of supply is the primary culprit. The inventory of homes for sale in most markets remains historically tight, yet demand continues to rise as millennials further age into homeownership. Limited supply and rising demand means house prices are surging, so why aren’t more existing homeowners selling their homes? Two market dynamics are at play.

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Topics: Housing, Interest Rates, Homeownership Progress Index, Insider

Will The Return Of ARMs Lead To Surging Loan App Defect Risk?

By Mark Fleming on March 29, 2018

It’s been a long time coming – a rising rate environment. The 30-year, fixed-rate mortgage has been below 4.5 percent since late 2013 and is now finally moving consistently higher. According to the consensus of economic forecasts, it is likely to approach 5 percent by the end of this year. This matters for defect, fraud and misrepresentation risk as rising mortgage rates reduce the benefit of refinancing and increase the share of purchase loan transactions in the market. As we have noted before, purchase loan transactions are riskier than refinance transactions.

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Topics: Housing, Interest Rates, Loan Application Defect Index